DISASTER AT SAVO ISLAND, 1942

Reading time: 50 minutes The Battle of Savo Island The Battle of Savo Island occurred early in the morning on 9 August 1942 when the the Japanese 8th Fleet surprised the Allied Task Force shortly after the landing at Guadalcanal. In approximately 37...

New research turns Tasmanian Aboriginal history on its head. The results will help care for the land

Reading time: 5 minutes American farmer and poet Wendell Berry said of the first Europeans in North America that they came with vision, but not with sight. They came with vision of former places but not the sight to see what was before them. Instead of...

Remembering the Victory at Bardia

Reading time: 8 minutes Just over 80 years ago, Australian forces fought their first major battle of World War II. Bardia, a small town on the coast of Libya, some 30 km from the Egyptian border, was an Italian stronghold. The Australian troops occupied Bardia,...

THE PHANTOM OLYMPICS-Why Japan Forfeited Hosting the 1940 Olympics

Reading time: 6 minutes When the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo were canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it was only the fourth time that international events prevented the games from going forward. Perhaps surprisingly, this was the second time for Tokyo, although...

Sudan’s ‘forgotten’ pyramids risk being buried by shifting sand dunes

The word “pyramid” is synonymous with Egypt, but it is actually neighbouring Sudan that is home to the world’s largest collection of these spectacular ancient structures.

How our new archaeological research investigates Dark Emu’s idea of Aboriginal ‘agriculture’ and villages

Bruce Pascoe’s Dark Emu is in the news again, with the publication of a new book critiquing Pascoe’s arguments. Dark Emu builds on an earlier, less known work by archaeologist Rupert Gerritsen, who argued a number of regions across Australia should be considered centres of Aboriginal agriculture.

Scrap Iron Flotilla: The Royal Australian Navy at its Best

Reading time: 11 minutes To the Axis Powers, the Australian flotilla that fought in the Mediterranean during the Second World War appeared to be no threat. Anyone looking at the old, small and slow destroyer group would think the same. Soon, however, the Axis and the...

In 1968, computers got personal: How the ‘mother of all demos’ changed the world

Reading time: 7 minutes A scene from Doug Engelbart’s groundbreaking 1968 computer demo. Doug Engelbart Institute On a crisp California afternoon in early December 1968, a square-jawed, mild-mannered Stanford researcher named Douglas Engelbart took the stage at...

Sardines for breakfast, hypothermia rescues: the story of the cash-strapped, post-pandemic 1920 Olympics

Reading time: 8 minutes Since the global pandemic began, debate has raged over whether Tokyo should go ahead with the Olympic Games, now set to open on July 23. The same heated debates were heard the last time an Olympic Games were staged following a global pandemic —...

The voyage of Nicolas Baudin and ‘art in the service of science’

Reading time: 9 minutes The real-life story of French navigator Nicolas Baudin’s sea voyage to map the unknown coasts of Australia is more gripping than any fictionalised account. In the wake of the French Revolution in 1789, the French were experiencing a maelstrom...

Five Great Historically Accurate Films: Part Three

Reading time: 6 minutes READ PART ONE AND PART TWO By Michael Vecchio Saving Private Ryan (1998) Dir. Steven Spielberg Surely amongst the first titles to come to mind if asked to name a World War II movie, Saving Private Ryan is yet another Steven Spielberg...

The Battle of Cape Spada: The Australian Navy Proves Its Mettle

Reading time: 9 minutes The Battle of Cape Spada was a short, violent encounter on the 19th of July, 1940 where the cruiser HMAS Sydney of the Royal Australian Navy sank one Italian cruiser and severely damaged another off the coast of Crete. In this article, we go...

Book review: Farmers or Hunter-gatherers? The Dark Emu Debate rigorously critiques Bruce Pascoe’s argument

Reading time: 9 minutes Eminent Australian anthropologist Peter Sutton and respected field archaeologist Keryn Walshe have co-authored a meticulously researched new book, Farmers or Hunter-gatherers? The Dark Emu Debate. It’s set to become the definitive critique...

ROME’S AUGUSTUS AND THE ALLURE OF THE STRONGMAN

Reading time: 8 minutes The Roman emperor Augustus is held up by some as a statesman who brought peace, and as a potential model for the future. But what was the cost of Augustus’ peace, and how real was it? On his 2012 honeymoon to Rome, Facebook founder Mark...

How do archaeologists know where to dig?

Reading time: 7 minutes National Geographic magazines and Indiana Jones movies might have you picturing archaeologists excavating near Egyptian pyramids, Stonehenge and Machu Picchu. And some of us do work at these famous places. But...

Imperial Overconfidence: The Anglo-Zulu War

Reading time: 8 minutes For a fine example of overconfidence during the height of British Imperialism, look no further than the Anglo-Zulu War. Fought in the late 19th century after the invasion of Zululand, the British Empire faced a far greater challenge than...

Chickens tell tale of human migration across Pacific

Reading time: 6 minutes Holiday in Hawaii and one of the birds you’re most likely to encounter is the chicken. You find them everywhere from beaches, to car parks and on walks through the bushland. The locals warn that your chance of ever catching one are slim as...

From the Caribbean to Queensland: re-examining Australia’s ‘blackbirding’ past and its roots in the global slave trade

Reading time: 6 minutes There are moves afoot to scrub colonial businessman Benjamin Boyd’s name from the map. The owners of historic Boydtown on the NSW south coast are planning to change its name, while Ben Boyd National Park may also be renamed. Residents in...

Four of the most lethal infectious diseases of our time and how we’re overcoming them

Reading time: 10 minutes In 2013, the World Health Organisation declared antibiotic resistance was a threat to global health security. It can seem hard to believe that in the 21st century infectious diseases remain such a profound existential risk. But this...

CASTLES, CAVES AND ROCK SHELTERS

Reading time: 8 minutes Archaeology in the rugged landscape of Georgia reveals a medieval world where caves and underground shelters provided refuge from raiders, allowing a threatened civilisation to flourish Southwest Georgia, close to the borders with Turkey and...

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General History Quiz 71

The History Guild Weekly History Quiz.See how your history knowledge stacks up. Want to know more about any of the questions? Once you've finished the quiz click here to learn more. Want to know more about any of the questions? Learn More...

General History Quiz 71 Answer Info

Want to know a bit more about the questions in the quiz, or the story behind them? Read on! 1. What aircraft is this? Vickers Wellington - The Vickers Wellington was a British twin-engined, long-range medium bomber. It was designed during the mid-1930s and was the...

Online Event – A fine feat of War: The taking of Mont St Quentin 1918

August 3 @ 5:00 am Melbourne, Australia time. After the Allied successes of 8 August 1918 there was a series of hammer blows against the retreating Germans. However, by the end of that month the assaulting forces  were weakened themselves and decidedly...

General History Quiz 70

The History Guild Weekly History Quiz.See how your history knowledge stacks up. Want to know more about any of the questions? Once you've finished the quiz click here to learn more. Want to know more about any of the questions? Learn More...

General History Quiz 70 Answer Info

Want to know a bit more about the questions in the quiz, or the story behind them? Read on! 1. Which leader said "We will bury you!"? Nikita Khrushchev - While addressing the Western Bloc at the Soviet embassy on November 18, 1956 Khrushchev said "Whether you like it...

Online Event – Wings Over the Somme

July 20 @ 5:00 am Melbourne, Australia time. The Battle Of the Somme, seen through the eyes of those British Airman flying above it, offers a fascinating glimpse of the potential, and relevance, of air power over the Western Front. Whilst many accounts focus on the...

General History Quiz 69

The History Guild Weekly History Quiz.See how your history knowledge stacks up. Want to know more about any of the questions? Once you've finished the quiz click here to learn more. Want to know more about any of the questions? Learn More...

General History Quiz 69 Answer Info

Want to know a bit more about the questions in the quiz, or the story behind them? Read on! 1. Which school of painting was Australian artist Tom Roberts part of? Heidelberg School - Thomas Roberts was an English-born Australian artist and a key member of the...

Online Event – Special Missions In Persia And Russia, 1917-1919: Colonel Earnest Latchford MC MBE

July 14 @ 7:00 pm Melbourne,Australia time. In late 1918, thousands of Australian soldiers, exhausted and scarred from the conflict in Europe, began to head home to loved ones down under. However, one ANZAC headed the wrong way, toward more conflict and risk in...

Upcoming Online Event – France’s Plans for Ireland: Invasions 1796-1798

July 23 @ 3:30 am Melbourne Australia time In the 18th Century, Royalist France had made several plans to invade Britain by first landing troops in Ireland.  The threat had been very real in both the Seven Years’ War and during the American Revolution – an...